Nick Rushby
BJET Edito
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Nick Rushby
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Video 15m 43s .Audio (32MB)

To a large extent, the content of a peer reviewed journal is determined by the papers that are submitted for publication. That in turn is influenced by the authors' choice of journal and what they think the journal will publish. The editor has some limited control of the process by rejecting those contributions that s/he thinks are outside the journal's scope and the reviewers can also recommend against accepting submissions that do not fall within their perception of the scope. One of the outputs of this complex system is an evolving definition of what constitutes the field - in this case, the field of 'learning technology.' Certainly, the definition has evolved remarkably over the past 40 years. From a focus in the 1970s on how people learn, we come to the present day when a young researcher is most likely to think of educational technology in terms of charismatic mobile devices. This has prompted an ongoing discussion within the BJET Editorial Board on the need to redefine the field of learning technology.

  • Does the published scope of the Journal reflect the current reality?
  • Would it be appropriate to change the scope?
  • Would it be appropriate to attempt to change collective perception of learning technology?
  • Should we call it learning technology or educational technology?
  • Should the Journal be pro-active or reactive in the papers that it solicits and publishes?
  • What's important in the field?

The long term aim of this discussion is to describe and define the field of learning technology and to build an all encompassing theoretical framework. This is an ambitious aim and is going to take some time to achieve.
The Wiley-BJET seminar is one contribution to that discussion.

Prof. Diana Laurillard
Institute of Education

Prof. Diana Laurillard
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Video 14m 05s .Audio (27MB)

Colin Latchem
BJET Corresponding Editor

Colin Latchem
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Video 9m 34s . Audio (19MB)

Prof. Jill Jameson
University of Greenwich

Prof. Jill Jameson
Video 18m 58s .Audio (37MB)


This page has been created as an initial design and proof of concept for development purposes. Video resources play from YouTube and audio resources are prepared as MP3s. Video presentations recorded at the BERA Conference 2012. Produced by Mike O'Donoghue, School of Education, University of Manchester, UK. Updated: 14 November 2012.